FAQs

It’s the process where a Repair Certifier carries out a detailed inspection of a damaged vehicle to determine whether a vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, and advise the procedures if further repairs are required.

The Repair Certifier also monitors the repair process to make sure that any repair(s) to a vehicle (its structure, systems, components or equipment), restore the damaged or worn vehicle, to within safe tolerance of the state of the vehicle when manufactured.

Once satisfied that the repair(s) meet the legal requirements, the Repair Certifier provides an LT308 (Light vehicle repair records of certification).  

To determine if a vehicle requires Repair Certification, it will go through one or both of the following processes.

1

A border check – Imported vehicles into New Zealand can be border checked either in New Zealand or, overseas by approved vehicle inspection organisations. When a border inspection identifies damage on a vehicle, the vehicle is flagged as damaged on LANDATA and will require Entry Certification.

2

Entry Certification – All used vehicles entering or re-entering the NZ fleet (imported or de-registered) are required to go through a compliance inspection performed at an approved testing station/compliance centre by a Transport Service Delivery Agent (TSDA) before they can be registered for use on the road. This inspection is carried out by an Entry Certifier. If the Entry Certifier determines the vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, they will refer the vehicle for further inspection to a Repair Certifier for repair certification before it can be registered. The Entry Certifier will notify you if your vehicle requires assessment by a Repair Certifier.

Entry certification allows for 21 days to complete any rectifications, before a complete full entry-level certification inspection must be repeated (and paid for) – the only exception to this requirement is if the vehicle has been held within the Entry or Repair Certifier’s quarantine system, which provides 180 days from the original inspection, and may be applied to vehicles that are immobile awaiting parts or repairs required to rectify defects found during entry-level inspection. The quarantine system operates under several specific requirements.

When the Entry Certifier determines that the vehicle meets the requirements, they will issue a warrant of fitness and a registration application form (MR2A), which verifies that the vehicle now complies with NZ standards and is permitted to be registered for use on NZ roads.

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

It’s the process where a Repair Certifier carries out a detailed inspection of a damaged vehicle to determine whether a vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, and advise the procedures if further repairs are required.

The Repair Certifier also monitors the repair process to make sure that any repair(s) to a vehicle (its structure, systems, components or equipment), restore the damaged or worn vehicle, to within safe tolerance of the state of the vehicle when manufactured.

Once satisfied that the repair(s) meet the legal requirements, the Repair Certifier provides an LT308 (Light vehicle repair records of certification).  

To determine if a vehicle requires Repair Certification, it will go through one or both of the following processes.

1

A border check – Imported vehicles into New Zealand can be border checked either in New Zealand or, overseas by approved vehicle inspection organisations. When a border inspection identifies damage on a vehicle, the vehicle is flagged as damaged on LANDATA and will require Entry Certification.

2

Entry Certification – All used vehicles entering or re-entering the NZ fleet (imported or de-registered) are required to go through a compliance inspection performed at an approved testing station/compliance centre by a Transport Service Delivery Agent (TSDA) before they can be registered for use on the road. This inspection is carried out by an Entry Certifier. If the Entry Certifier determines the vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, they will refer the vehicle for further inspection to a Repair Certifier for repair certification before it can be registered. The Entry Certifier will notify you if your vehicle requires assessment by a Repair Certifier.

Entry certification allows for 21 days to complete any rectifications, before a complete full entry-level certification inspection must be repeated (and paid for) – the only exception to this requirement is if the vehicle has been held within the Entry or Repair Certifier’s quarantine system, which provides 180 days from the original inspection, and may be applied to vehicles that are immobile awaiting parts or repairs required to rectify defects found during entry-level inspection. The quarantine system operates under several specific requirements.

When the Entry Certifier determines that the vehicle meets the requirements, they will issue a warrant of fitness and a registration application form (MR2A), which verifies that the vehicle now complies with NZ standards and is permitted to be registered for use on NZ roads.

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

It’s the process where a Repair Certifier carries out a detailed inspection of a damaged vehicle to determine whether a vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, and advise the procedures if further repairs are required.

The Repair Certifier also monitors the repair process to make sure that any repair(s) to a vehicle (its structure, systems, components or equipment), restore the damaged or worn vehicle, to within safe tolerance of the state of the vehicle when manufactured.

Once satisfied that the repair(s) meet the legal requirements, the Repair Certifier provides an LT308 (Light vehicle repair records of certification).  

To determine if a vehicle requires Repair Certification, it will go through one or both of the following processes.

1

A border check – Imported vehicles into New Zealand can be border checked either in New Zealand or, overseas by approved vehicle inspection organisations. When a border inspection identifies damage on a vehicle, the vehicle is flagged as damaged on LANDATA and will require Entry Certification.

2

Entry Certification – All used vehicles entering or re-entering the NZ fleet (imported or de-registered) are required to go through a compliance inspection performed at an approved testing station/compliance centre by a Transport Service Delivery Agent (TSDA) before they can be registered for use on the road. This inspection is carried out by an Entry Certifier. If the Entry Certifier determines the vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, they will refer the vehicle for further inspection to a Repair Certifier for repair certification before it can be registered. The Entry Certifier will notify you if your vehicle requires assessment by a Repair Certifier.

Entry certification allows for 21 days to complete any rectifications, before a complete full entry-level certification inspection must be repeated (and paid for) – the only exception to this requirement is if the vehicle has been held within the Entry or Repair Certifier’s quarantine system, which provides 180 days from the original inspection, and may be applied to vehicles that are immobile awaiting parts or repairs required to rectify defects found during entry-level inspection. The quarantine system operates under several specific requirements.

When the Entry Certifier determines that the vehicle meets the requirements, they will issue a warrant of fitness and a registration application form (MR2A), which verifies that the vehicle now complies with NZ standards and is permitted to be registered for use on NZ roads.

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

It’s the process where a Repair Certifier carries out a detailed inspection of a damaged vehicle to determine whether a vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, and advise the procedures if further repairs are required.

The Repair Certifier also monitors the repair process to make sure that any repair(s) to a vehicle (its structure, systems, components or equipment), restore the damaged or worn vehicle, to within safe tolerance of the state of the vehicle when manufactured.

Once satisfied that the repair(s) meet the legal requirements, the Repair Certifier provides an LT308 (Light vehicle repair records of certification).  

To determine if a vehicle requires Repair Certification, it will go through one or both of the following processes.

1

A border check – Imported vehicles into New Zealand can be border checked either in New Zealand or, overseas by approved vehicle inspection organisations. When a border inspection identifies damage on a vehicle, the vehicle is flagged as damaged on LANDATA and will require Entry Certification.

2

Entry Certification – All used vehicles entering or re-entering the NZ fleet (imported or de-registered) are required to go through a compliance inspection performed at an approved testing station/compliance centre by a Transport Service Delivery Agent (TSDA) before they can be registered for use on the road. This inspection is carried out by an Entry Certifier. If the Entry Certifier determines the vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, they will refer the vehicle for further inspection to a Repair Certifier for repair certification before it can be registered. The Entry Certifier will notify you if your vehicle requires assessment by a Repair Certifier.

Entry certification allows for 21 days to complete any rectifications, before a complete full entry-level certification inspection must be repeated (and paid for) – the only exception to this requirement is if the vehicle has been held within the Entry or Repair Certifier’s quarantine system, which provides 180 days from the original inspection, and may be applied to vehicles that are immobile awaiting parts or repairs required to rectify defects found during entry-level inspection. The quarantine system operates under several specific requirements.

When the Entry Certifier determines that the vehicle meets the requirements, they will issue a warrant of fitness and a registration application form (MR2A), which verifies that the vehicle now complies with NZ standards and is permitted to be registered for use on NZ roads.

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

It’s the process where a Repair Certifier carries out a detailed inspection of a damaged vehicle to determine whether a vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, and advise the procedures if further repairs are required.

The Repair Certifier also monitors the repair process to make sure that any repair(s) to a vehicle (its structure, systems, components or equipment), restore the damaged or worn vehicle, to within safe tolerance of the state of the vehicle when manufactured.

Once satisfied that the repair(s) meet the legal requirements, the Repair Certifier provides an LT308 (Light vehicle repair records of certification).  

To determine if a vehicle requires Repair Certification, it will go through one or both of the following processes.

1

A border check – Imported vehicles into New Zealand can be border checked either in New Zealand or, overseas by approved vehicle inspection organisations. When a border inspection identifies damage on a vehicle, the vehicle is flagged as damaged on LANDATA and will require Entry Certification.

2

Entry Certification – All used vehicles entering or re-entering the NZ fleet (imported or de-registered) are required to go through a compliance inspection performed at an approved testing station/compliance centre by a Transport Service Delivery Agent (TSDA) before they can be registered for use on the road. This inspection is carried out by an Entry Certifier. If the Entry Certifier determines the vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, they will refer the vehicle for further inspection to a Repair Certifier for repair certification before it can be registered. The Entry Certifier will notify you if your vehicle requires assessment by a Repair Certifier.

Entry certification allows for 21 days to complete any rectifications, before a complete full entry-level certification inspection must be repeated (and paid for) – the only exception to this requirement is if the vehicle has been held within the Entry or Repair Certifier’s quarantine system, which provides 180 days from the original inspection, and may be applied to vehicles that are immobile awaiting parts or repairs required to rectify defects found during entry-level inspection. The quarantine system operates under several specific requirements.

When the Entry Certifier determines that the vehicle meets the requirements, they will issue a warrant of fitness and a registration application form (MR2A), which verifies that the vehicle now complies with NZ standards and is permitted to be registered for use on NZ roads.

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

It’s the process where a Repair Certifier carries out a detailed inspection of a damaged vehicle to determine whether a vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, and advise the procedures if further repairs are required.

The Repair Certifier also monitors the repair process to make sure that any repair(s) to a vehicle (its structure, systems, components or equipment), restore the damaged or worn vehicle, to within safe tolerance of the state of the vehicle when manufactured.

Once satisfied that the repair(s) meet the legal requirements, the Repair Certifier provides an LT308 (Light vehicle repair records of certification).  

To determine if a vehicle requires Repair Certification, it will go through one or both of the following processes.

1

A border check – Imported vehicles into New Zealand can be border checked either in New Zealand or, overseas by approved vehicle inspection organisations. When a border inspection identifies damage on a vehicle, the vehicle is flagged as damaged on LANDATA and will require Entry Certification.

2

Entry Certification – All used vehicles entering or re-entering the NZ fleet (imported or de-registered) are required to go through a compliance inspection performed at an approved testing station/compliance centre by a Transport Service Delivery Agent (TSDA) before they can be registered for use on the road. This inspection is carried out by an Entry Certifier. If the Entry Certifier determines the vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, they will refer the vehicle for further inspection to a Repair Certifier for repair certification before it can be registered. The Entry Certifier will notify you if your vehicle requires assessment by a Repair Certifier.

Entry certification allows for 21 days to complete any rectifications, before a complete full entry-level certification inspection must be repeated (and paid for) – the only exception to this requirement is if the vehicle has been held within the Entry or Repair Certifier’s quarantine system, which provides 180 days from the original inspection, and may be applied to vehicles that are immobile awaiting parts or repairs required to rectify defects found during entry-level inspection. The quarantine system operates under several specific requirements.

When the Entry Certifier determines that the vehicle meets the requirements, they will issue a warrant of fitness and a registration application form (MR2A), which verifies that the vehicle now complies with NZ standards and is permitted to be registered for use on NZ roads.

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

It’s the process where a Repair Certifier carries out a detailed inspection of a damaged vehicle to determine whether a vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, and advise the procedures if further repairs are required.

The Repair Certifier also monitors the repair process to make sure that any repair(s) to a vehicle (its structure, systems, components or equipment), restore the damaged or worn vehicle, to within safe tolerance of the state of the vehicle when manufactured.

Once satisfied that the repair(s) meet the legal requirements, the Repair Certifier provides an LT308 (Light vehicle repair records of certification).  

To determine if a vehicle requires Repair Certification, it will go through one or both of the following processes.

1

A border check – Imported vehicles into New Zealand can be border checked either in New Zealand or, overseas by approved vehicle inspection organisations. When a border inspection identifies damage on a vehicle, the vehicle is flagged as damaged on LANDATA and will require Entry Certification.

2

Entry Certification – All used vehicles entering or re-entering the NZ fleet (imported or de-registered) are required to go through a compliance inspection performed at an approved testing station/compliance centre by a Transport Service Delivery Agent (TSDA) before they can be registered for use on the road. This inspection is carried out by an Entry Certifier. If the Entry Certifier determines the vehicle requires, or has had, repairs to fix structural damage or deterioration due to impact, corrosion, or metal fatigue, they will refer the vehicle for further inspection to a Repair Certifier for repair certification before it can be registered. The Entry Certifier will notify you if your vehicle requires assessment by a Repair Certifier.

Entry certification allows for 21 days to complete any rectifications, before a complete full entry-level certification inspection must be repeated (and paid for) – the only exception to this requirement is if the vehicle has been held within the Entry or Repair Certifier’s quarantine system, which provides 180 days from the original inspection, and may be applied to vehicles that are immobile awaiting parts or repairs required to rectify defects found during entry-level inspection. The quarantine system operates under several specific requirements.

When the Entry Certifier determines that the vehicle meets the requirements, they will issue a warrant of fitness and a registration application form (MR2A), which verifies that the vehicle now complies with NZ standards and is permitted to be registered for use on NZ roads.

Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.
Click edit button to change this text. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.